Bacon Collar: 3 fixes and 3 no-nos for the common shirt problem

Shirt collars can be a pain. After just a single wash, that crisp fold is gone and you’re left with wrinkles and creases instead – the dreaded “bacon collar." Conventional dryers aren’t much help but there are a few life hacks to restoring that sloppy shirt collar back to its original self as well as a few to avoid. 

1. Ironing: It’s the tried and true solution. The heat, pressure and moisture from the iron smooth out even the most stubborn wrinkles. When ironing, make sure to check the kind of shirt - cotton and cotton blends can take higher temperatures while polyester shirts need lower heat. This only works, of course, if you own an iron, and can wait a few minutes for it to heat up. Not ideal if you have just one shirt to do.

2. Dry cleaning: For about $2, your local dry cleaner will get that collar looking almost new using a special petroleum-based chemical used to remove stains and grease. But while that crisp dry cleaner look may be great for dress shirts, it may not be the best for polos and casual button-downs since they will have an overly pressed, almost boxy look.

3. SnapCollar:  This new invention uses pressure and moisture to firmly press shirt collars back into place without the need for heat or chemicals. SnapCollar works for on all kinds of shirts, including polos, dress shirts, oxfords, button downs, and is easy to put on or take off. It is also a great travel companion - put it on before you pack so your collar is nice and pressed at your destination. 

 

What not to do to fix Bacon Collar:

1. Shower: some people hang a wrinkled shirt in the bathroom and take a hot shower. This isn’t the recommended method because it only removes wrinkles and won’t fix a messy fold, curling corner or strange creases in the collar. Plus, the shower needs to run on hot water for a significant period to be effective, wasting valuable water and energy.

2. Steamer: much like the shower, the steamer is recommended for wrinkles but not folds, corners or creases. While a handy tool, steamers aren't a silver bullet to fix and shirt problem

3. Soak collars after wear: others have suggested pressing wet collars into place after removing them from the dryer. This doesn’t guarantee the fabric bonds won’t snap back to the bacon neck you had before. When clothes get wet, the fabric’s molecular bonds that form “bacon collar” break down but need some guiding to reattach to take the shape of the collar’s original look. Your hands pressing the clothes for a minute or two isn’t long enough for the shirt to dry and for bond

 

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